Last edited 30 Sep 2016

Types of dwelling

Contents

[edit] Introduction

A dwelling is a unit of residential accommodation occupied by a single person or by people living together as a family or by not more than six residents living together as a single household, including a household where care is provided for residents.

According to the English Housing Survey Housing Stock Report, 2014-15, prepared by the Department of Communities and Local Government, dwellings are classified into the following categories:

[edit] Small terraced house

A house with a total floor area of less than 70m2 forming part of a block where at least one house is attached to two or more other houses. The total floor area is measured using the original EHS definition of usable floor area, used in EHS reports up to and including the 2012 reports. That definition tends to yield a smaller floor area compared with the definition that is aligned with the Nationally Described Space Standard and used on the EHS since 2013. As a result of the difference between the two definitions, some small terraced houses are reported in the 2014 Housing Stock Report as having more than 70m².

[edit] Medium/large terraced house

A house with a total floor area of 70m2 or more forming part of a block where at least one house is attached to two or more other houses. The total floor area is measured using the original EHS definition of useable floor area which tends to yield a small floor area compared with the definition used on the EHS since 2013.

[edit] End terraced house

A house attached to one other house only in a block where at least one house is attached to two or more other houses.

[edit] Mid terraced house

A house attached to two other houses in a block.

[edit] Semi-detached house

A house that is attached to just one other in a block of two.

[edit] Detached house

A house where none of the habitable structure is joined to another building (other than garages, outhouses etc.).

[edit] Bungalow

A house with all of the habitable accommodation on one floor. This excludes chalet bungalows and bungalows with habitable loft conversions, which are treated as houses.

[edit] Converted flat.

A flat resulting from the conversion of a house or former non-residential building. Includes buildings converted into a flat plus commercial premises (such as corner shops).

[edit] Purpose built flat, low rise

A flat in a purpose built block less than six storeys high. Includes cases where there is only one flat with independent access in a building which is also used for non-domestic purposes.

[edit] Purpose built flat, high rise

A flat in a purpose built block of at least six storeys high.

[edit] Shared or not shared

A dwelling is shared if:

  • The household spaces it contains are ‘part of a converted or shared house’, or
  • Not all of the rooms (including kitchen, bathroom and toilet, if any) are behind a door that only that household can use, and
  • There is at least one other such household space at the same address with which it can be combined to form the shared dwelling.

Dwellings that do not meet these conditions are unshared dwellings.

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