Last edited 13 Jan 2019

Non-combustible material

Approved document J, Combustion appliances and fuel storage systems defines ‘non-combustible materials’ as:

‘…the highest level of reaction to fire performance. Non-combustible materials include:

Typical examples of such materials to be found in buildings include totally inorganic materials such as concrete, fired clay, ceramics, metals, plaster and masonry containing not more than 1% by weight or volume of organic material. (Use in buildings of combustible metals such as magnesium–aluminium alloys should be assessed in each individual case.)'

Following the Grenfell Tower Fire, a decision was taken to ban combustible materials in the cladding for buildings over 18m in height. The following change to approved document 7 came into force on 21 December 2018.

The Building Regulations restrict the use of combustible materials in the external walls of certain buildings over 18m in height. Refer to regulation 7(2) of the Building Regulations and to Approved Document B: volume 2, part B4 for details.

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