Last edited 14 Apr 2020

Healthy Streets

Healthy streets 5184.jpg

Contents

[edit] Introduction

Healthy Streets and its 10 Indicators are concepts that first appeared in Transport for London policy in 2014. The programme was developed by Lucy Saunders, a specialist in public health and transport, and the term was officially introduced by London Mayor Sadiq Khan in October 2016. This approach to urban development puts the emphasis on streets that promote active pedestrian and public transport travel, have clean air and are safe.

The goal of Healthy Streets is to design a long-term plan that encourages people to walk and cycle throughout London. While this concept will be applied differently based on location, examples such as the pedestrianisation of Oxford Street and the Rotherhithe to Canary Wharf cycle bridge are part of the plan.

[edit] Indicators

The 10 indicators of Healthy streets are:

  • People choose to walk, cycle and use public transport.
  • Pedestrians from all walks of life.
  • Easy to cross.
  • People feel safe.
  • Things to see and do.
  • Places to stop and rest.
  • People feel relaxed.
  • Not too noisy.
  • Clean air.
  • Shade and shelter.

[edit] Three levels of Healthy Streets

Healthy Streets operate at three levels:

  1. Street – walking, cycling and better overall public spaces.
  2. Transport – walking and cycling and better public transport routes.
  3. Strategic – walking and cycling to shops, schools or work supported by better development patterns..

By 2025, the programme seeks to cut London’s carbon dioxide levels by 60% (compared to 1990 levels) and increase daily walking or cycling trips for Londoners by up to 20 minutes per day.

[edit] Health factors

With a reduction or redirection of road traffic through the Healthy Streets programme, people will be able to experience health benefits such as:

  • Exercising more regularly through walking or cycling.
  • Experiencing cleaner air and less noise pollution.
  • Enjoying safer roads.

Mental health levels can also be improved through this initiative, since people will benefit from more direct environmental experiences enhanced by interesting and attractive parts of the city they may have otherwise missed.

You can find out more at: https://tfl.gov.uk/corporate/about-tfl/how-we-work/planning-for-the-future/healthy-streets

[edit] Related articles on Designing Buildings Wiki

[edit] External references

Transport for London - Healthy Streets Explained (pdf)

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