Last edited 08 Mar 2018

Schedule of accommodation

A schedule of accommodation is an itemised list of accommodation facilities and provisions required by the end user of a building project. It will usually be developed by the consultant team during the concept design stage. The operational, spatial and locational requirements of the end user should be taken into consideration when compiling the schedule of accommodation.

It may include:

  • Room reference number.
  • Room location (for example, building name / floor).
  • Room name.
  • Room type / description.
  • Room size (i.e. floor area, and sometimes dimensions, which may include height).
  • Number and type of occupants.
  • Relationships between rooms and groups of rooms.
  • Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) requirements.
  • Environmental conditions required (i.e. temperature range, humidity, air movement, acoustic conditions, lighting levels and so on).
  • Total areas.
  • Exclusions (such as circulation spaces).

The preparation of a schedule of accommodation helps to determine the minimum space requirements for the building(s), and so the site space requirements necessary to achieve a specific design as proposed by the project brief. It can also help within early cost estimates.

The schedule may be developed based on benchmarking information or accepted space standards (such as the space required per pupil for classrooms, the space per person for theatres and so on) and must take into consideration specific requirements of the building regulations, planning guidance, client policies, health and safety requirements and so on.

Individual room data sheets may also be developed, giving a more detailed description of the finishes, fixtures and fittings, mechanical and electrical requirements that will be required for each room. For more information see: Room data sheet.

Schedules of accommodation may also be prepared or maintained for existing buildings for operational purposes, such as maintenance, space allocation, room booking and so on.

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