Last edited 12 May 2016

Professional standards for architects

Contents

[edit] ARB

The Architects Registration Board (ARB) was established by the Architects Act 1997 to:

  • Maintain a register of architects.
  • Control use of the title.
  • Prescribe qualifications for entry to the register.
  • Regulate the profession under a Code of conduct that sets out standards of professional behaviour.
  • Ensure codes are not broken through disciplinary procedures
  1. UPC: Unacceptable Professional Conduct
  2. SPI: Serious Professional Incompetence

[edit] Legislative background

Architects Act 1997:

  • Created the ARB as statutory body.
  • Sets out a regulatory framework for profession.

The Professional Qualifications Directive 2005:

  • Provides for mutual recognition of qualifications throughout Europe.

The Services Directive 2006:

  • Assists practices setting up abroad.
  • Sets standards of protection for service providers.

ARB Architects code: Standards of Conduct and Practice, establishes 12 standards:

  1. Be honest and act with integrity
  2. Be competent
  3. Promote your services honestly and responsibly
  4. Manage your business competently
  5. Consider the wider impact of your work
  6. Carry out your work faithfully and conscientiously
  7. Be trustworthy and look after your clients’ money properly
  8. Have appropriate insurance arrangements
  9. Maintain the reputation of architects
  10. Deal with disputes or complaints appropriately
  11. Co-operate with regulatory requirements and investigations
  12. Have respect for others

[edit] RIBA

The Royal Institute of British Architects champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture and our members. It provides the standards, training, support and recognition that assists in meeting these targets.

It publishes a Code of Professional Conduct with 3 basic principles:

  1. Integrity: act with honesty and integrity at all times
  2. Competence: act responsibly, competently, conscientiously. Provide knowledge, ability, financial & technical resources appropriate for the work.
  3. Relationships: respect rights and interests of others.

There are also professional values that support these principles and guidance notes about how the principles can be upheld. Guidance note 6 relates to CPD: The RIBA's interesting and varied CPD programme keeps architects and other construction professionals up-to-date with the right skills and core competencies.

[edit] What is the difference between ARB and RIBA?

Under the Architects Act, the term ‘architect’ is protected – only those on the Register of Architects are permitted to use the title. The statutory body set up by parliament to administer the register is the Architects Registration Board (ARB – formerly ARCUK). As such, the ARB is quite distinct from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), which is a voluntary association of architects in the UK and overseas. A significant number of UK registered architects choose not to join the RIBA: according to recent figures, one in five of the registered architects in the UK are not members of the RIBA.

See also: Rules and regulations affecting architects.