Last edited 05 Jan 2018

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Becoming a Chartered Member of CIAT

Ben Whitemore tells AT about his route to progression and becoming a Chartered Member.

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To begin, this is a bit about me. I am originally from Somerset, but I currently live and work in Bristol having graduated three years ago. Outside of work, I am a keen rugby player and spectator; enjoy the occasional fishing trip and am training for a triathlon. I am currently employed by BDP (Building Design Partnership) as an Architectural Technologist. BDP is a major international practice of technologists, architects, designers, engineers and urbanists.

Originally established in 1961, BDP now has studios across the world. I am based in BDP’s Bristol office, having not long returned from a secondment to our London office. I predominantly work within the healthcare and science sectors, typically producing and managing information through tender to construction, preparing technical drawings, advising on our approach to using Revit and implementing BIM, engaging with clients, contractors, suppliers and other consultants.

My CIAT Accredited degree ensured I had a solid platform on which to build my career and provided the stepping stones towards securing a job and my development towards becoming a Chartered Architectural Technologist. During my time at university, I was able to study a wide variety of subjects from technology and environments, integrated building design to law and construction contracts. The degree enabled me to confidently step into the industry following graduation and quickly progress my understanding, knowledge and ability Chartered Architectural Technologist.

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During my time at university, I was able to study a wide variety of subjects from technology and environments, integrated building design to law and construction contracts. The degree enabled me to confidently step into the industry following graduation and quickly progress my understanding, knowledge and ability

My Chartership progression began after I attended a Membership Progression Session, which not only did I find very useful in clarifying and advising how to progress my membership, but gave previous examples and guides on how to develop my application. Following the seminar, I quickly started to collate work I had previously completed and was able to begin filling out the Professional Assessment application form.

Working only on weekdays after work hours, I was able to produce and submit my application within six weeks. Thankfully, I passed my Professional Interview in June 2016, two years after graduating from university.

Not only does the MCIAT qualification give you a professionally qualified status, but during the process I was able to identify where my knowledge and abilities lie, and also where my knowledge and abilities lie, but also where my weaknesses are and what I need to improve and build upon. By becoming MCIAT, you are able to demonstrate that you are a recognised professional in your field and have extensive knowledge. With the intense competition for jobs available, you are also placing yourself well in the market, should you be looking!

I recommend to recent graduates, or anyone for that matter, that attending a Membership Progression Session is a wise and productive starting point before embarking on your Professional Assessment qualifying process. Collate your work that you have previously produced from a few projects that you know really well, and start to build up your application. Complete it with sufficient time as it is a document that will showcase your abilities and experience required to become a Chartered Architectural Technologist.


This article was originally published in AT ed. 122.

--CIAT

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Comments

Well done on your achievements.

It would be great to see more articles like this on the Wiki.