Last edited 06 Jan 2019

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Compliant public transport node

For the purposes of the Home Quality Mark, a compliant public transport node can includes buses, trams, trains, tubes and other types of public transport, for which, the service stopping at each node must provide transport from, or onward travel to, either an urban centre, major transport node or a community focal point, for example, a doctor's surgery, library, school or village centre. Only local services should be assessed and any national public transport services should be excluded from the analysis, unless such a service can be said to provide a local commuter service.

A compliant urban node includes any bus service with a stop within 400m and any railway station within 800m of the assessed building's main entrance, measured via a safe pedestrian route (not 'as the crow flies').

A compliant rural node includes any bus service with a stop within 800m and any railway station within 1600m of the assessed building's main entrance, measured via a safe pedestrian route (not 'as the crow flies').

Where an urban area is one with a population of 10,000 people or more, located within a tract of predominantly built-up land. This definition applies to the expected post-development population.

A rural location is any settlement or land that does not meet the definition of urban.

Ref Home Quality Mark One, Technical Manual SD239, England, Scotland & Wales, published by BRE in 2018.

--BRE Group

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