Last edited 23 May 2016

Development House, Shoreditch

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In March 2016, architects Waugh Thistleton revealed plans for a timber-framed office block in London’s Shoreditch.

The new nine-storey structure, covering 8,000 sq. m, is intended to replace the existing Development House at Leonard Circus and when completed will be one of London’s tallest modern timber-framed buildings.

The project highlights timber’s continuing resurgence as a building material, with Waugh Thistleton director Andrew Waugh suggesting “this is the beginning of the timber age”.

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The building will utilise two types of engineered wood – glued laminated timber, or glulam as it is commonly known, which is made by layering and gluing multiple slices of wood together; and cross-laminated timber which involves arranging layers at right angles. Both have the advantage of being significantly stronger than regular timber.

The structure will be organised around a central core, and is divided into five quadrants. There will be a large ground level foyer as well as a series of vertical slices with sections of glazing around the perimeter offering light and ventilation. This will also allow passersby to see the timber floor plates through the windows.

Andrew Waugh said, “building in timber offers a number of advantages, including minimised time on site, and associated sound and waste disturbance. This translates to less impact on adjacent occupiers, street users and surrounding community.”

"This is a really exciting scheme that can transform one of the key development sites in Shoreditch by creating a truly iconic building," said Conrad Peberdy, director for property developer Ethical Property.

Other new London buildings to exploit timber include a 33-metre-high apartment block, also in Shoreditch, and a house for artist Richard Woods.

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Renderings by ForbesMassie.

For more information, see Waugh Thistleton

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