About Amcalpin

Civil Engineering student at the University of Bristol.

United Kingdom

Andrew is a second year Civil Engineering student at the University of Bristol. Prior to starting his studies in Bristol, Andrew was a Team Leader for a leading supermarket, where he worked through his gap year before leaving to travel for six months.

During breaks from school and university, Andrew has worked full time in the residential lettings industry for one of the countries largest letting agents. His experience in this field spans over three years and through this work Andrew has become well versed in the rules and regulations of the residential lettings industry.


[edit] How do we keep investors interested in UK property?

One of the many signs of post depression economic recovery is the rise in property prices across the country. The Guardian recently reported that the average UK home is now worth £173,678 - a huge £10,000 increase on last year's figure. The UK now faces the mammoth challenge of sustaining investors' interest; this is a skill which requires creativity and the ability to look at all of the options of the proverbial table, regardless of how crazy they may seem at first.

It was as I sat here, in the heart of Bristol's university precinct, that I pondered this question and it struck me that the answer is, in fact, all around me. That is to say that students are in fact at least part of the answer to this conundrum, in my opinion. I firmly believe that this important group should not be overlooked when it comes to investment.

This will be no easy task as, quite understandably, most graduates won't even have a credit rating or employment after leaving university, let alone the means to invest in something so seemingly absurd as property. However, graduates should be offered advice on the benefits of investing in the rising UK property market and there should be appropriate buy-to-let mortgages and special interest rates - like there is student bank accounts and student discounts - on properties in university towns for those that have recently finished their university course, thereby allowing them to get their foot on the property ladder at an earlier age. With controlled measures in place (e.g. parental guarantors or proof of graduate employment), it may lead to graduates becoming continuing property investors and, with the number of graduates almost definitely set to increase, this is a target group which could expand alongside the expanding property market.

This is important and large potential market for the UK property industry and I strongly believe that with proper provisions in place, it could not only recruit long term investors and underline the UK's innovative approach to investment, but also ensure that the current generation of graduates actually have the means and, most importantly, desire to own property.